HeinOnline — Your Law Review and Journal Go-To Resource

I know.  You’ve heard tell of HeinOnline and you’ve wondered what all the fuss is about.  Well, grab a cup of coffee (or tea) and let’s chat a bit about Hein’s ever-growing collection of legal materials — in particular, it’s extensive collection of law reviews and journals.

Coverage:   Hein has a collection of  more than 1,700 law and law-related journals beginning with the first issue published through the most-currently published issues (although some have a contractual embargo, generally for a year, for the most current issues).

Where to Find Hein:   To access Hein’s collection of law reviews and journals,  go to the Jameson Law Library website and click on the “Law Library Databases” link.   Select HeinOnline from the list and then click on “Law Journal Library” at Hein’s home page (see below).

Hein-1-home page

Locating Publications:  You’ll find it’s easy to locate publications by title, state, country, or most-cited.   For example, if you want to locate the Montana Law Review,  select the letter “M” under “By Publication,” and scroll down to Montana Law Review.   At this point, you can search the title or expand by volume number,  as the screenshot below indicates.   Also notice that the Montana Law Review offers e-Table of Contents (TOC) alert and RSS Feed options, features not provided by  all law reviews or journals.

Hein-3-MtLRev-expanded

Searching on Hein:    A variety of search options are available on Hein.   If you have a citation, you can use the Citation Navigator in the left column.  You can also conduct a field search or advanced search.  Hein uses Terms and Connectors searching, which means, for example, quotation marks are required to retrieve phrases and Boolean operators must be in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS.   Let’s say you are interested in law reviews about constitutional law in Montana.   You might conduct your search per the example below:

Hein-4-example field search

Search Tip:   When you are looking for law reviews on a particular topic consider selecting “Article Title” from the drop-down box (instead of “Text”).   Generally, if the topic (such as “constitutional law”) is in the title of the article, you are assured of retrieving law review articles with substantial information on that topic.   When you search by “Text,” although you will retrieve more results, it’s also likely that these results will be less relevant or not on point because your topic term or phrase may only appear in a footnote or be mentioned merely in passing.   The results list of our sample search looks like this:

Hein-5-example field search-results list

Refining Search Results:  There are seven results for our search.   Notice that the phrase “constitutional law” and the term “Montana” appear in the titles of the results list.   If you like, you can further refine the results by using the limiters in the left column — by type of article, subject, law review title, state where published, and date.

Article Format:   Articles are in PDF format and Hein offers a nice feature that allows you to search your PDF article.   Look for the magnifying glass at the top of the article page.   After clicking on the magnifying glass you have the option to search for a term or phrase in the section, on the page, or in the title.   Also, a page number drop-down box enables you to move quickly to a desired page.   On the left column is a list of retrieved articles (or you may see a table of contents), as well as links to clear, revise, or return to results.

Hein-6-MtLRev-example of article

There is much more to talk about when it comes to Hein, but it’s time to get back to work.  We’ll pick up the conversation about this unique and useful research resource again on another day.  Stay tuned.

Getting Assistance:    In the meantime, for help and support using Hein, you can visit HeinOnline Help & Support, complete with PDF guides, video tutorials, search examples, and more.   And, of course, you can always ask the friendly Jameson Law Library staff for assistance — don’t be shy!   That’s what we’re here for.

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